Bluefriars

28 Sep

From Putney Bridge right up to Tower Bridge, blue lights illuminate the passage of water in and out of the North Sea with each tide twice a day. The lights’ continued spread still appears to be an unconscious policy, but they continue to expand presently with the nearly completed rebuilding of Blackfriars station, reconstructing the Victorian rail bridge to make way for longer trains on First Capital Connect’s Thameslink route and creating new entrances north and south of the river.

Between 1886 and 1937, it was known as St Paul’s Station and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway boasted the power to transport Londoners as far as Brindisi, Marseilles and Sr Petersburg. The new station has moved around the bend from Queen Victoria Street to New Bridge Street beside Blackfriars Bridge and incorporates the Underground with improved public access.

The new railway bridge will also be Europe’s largest solar panelled bridge, holding 4,400 panels which will generate half of the station’s electricity.

We night drivers will be relieved when the regular closure of Blackfriars Underpass ceases and we can bomb along–at 30mph–between East and West London once more.

3 Responses to “Bluefriars”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Blue is the new green on the ThamesCabbieBlog - 52 November 13, 2012

    […] almost every bridge spanning the Thames is bathed in a blue glow. My cabbie colleague in his the capital letters blog has dubbed the new Blackfriars Station, which spans the Thames and is illuminated with the […]

  2. blue is the new green - 12 December 19, 2012

    […] almost every bridge spanning the Thames is bathed in a blue glow. My cabbie colleague in his the capital letters blog has dubbed the new Blackfriars Station, which spans the Thames and is illuminated with the […]

  3. London taxi sacrificed at the green altar - 16 December 19, 2012

    […] we have a guest post from Brian who writes about London at the Capital Letters Blog, his insights include taxis and life generally. His polemical view of today’s regulation by TfL […]

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